Wreck to Reef Update, January 2013

bbc-logoThis information was reported by BBC news from an interview we gave late last year.
While we are now actively seeking media coverage, we are learning fast that sometimes the media can unintentionally mix up some of those facts and figures.

The figure actually given was £20,000:00 and over a three year period, not one and for 12000 lobsters, not 6000. Very simply broken down, this is the cost of each juvenile lobster. It is hoped that they will be placed on the reef by volunteers.

We have been involved with very detailed talks with Southern IFCA and we are hopeful that they will be able to fund the initial phase of this lobster re-stocking programme. We will then be in a position to approach the European Fisheries Fund for match funding.

I can’t really go into too much detail about this next comment, but Neville Copperthwaite, Wreck to Reefs project coordinator is working closely with other much larger marine organisations and it is quite possible we could see tens of thousands of juvenile lobsters being released annually on Wreck to Reefs lobster re-stocking reef.

Another point worth mentioning, it is not about these juvenile lobsters, it is about the berry’s they will produce. These eggs will seed 25 miles East and 25 miles west with each tide. All of this fits in with our permissions and a regional campaign supported by the National Lobster Hatchery.

We will take a closer look at reports we re-circulate in the future.

Excerpt from BBC news report…

W2R Update January 2013 The first lobsters are set to be released at an artificial reef off the Dorset coast during the summer.

About 1,750 tonnes of Portland stone was sunk off Weymouth in May last year to form a sanctuary for lobsters.

Up to 1,000 of the crustaceans, donated by the National Lobster Hatchery based in Cornwall, will be released between June and August.

The project, run by community group Wreck to Reef, aims to boost lobster stocks to help the fishing industry.

Diving reef

The circular lobster reef, which will cost about £25,000 a year to maintain, is set to have 6,000 lobsters introduced annually from next year.

Wreck to Reef has approached Southern Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authority (IFCA) to fund the project, near Ringstead Bay, for three years from 2014.

Rocks have been used for the artificial reef as lobsters like to live in stony crevices.

The group also has long-term plans to sink two warships near Ringstead Bay as an artificial diving reef, similar to the one off Whitsand Bay in Plymouth where HMS Scylla was sunk in 2004.

Project co-ordinator Neville Copperthwaite said:

We’re currently in the process of approaching the MoD and the Treasury for a ship.

It is estimated that sinking a single ship brings in £1.6m to the local economy.

Link to BBC here

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3 Responses to Wreck to Reef Update, January 2013

  1. alan jones January 31, 2013 at 10:28 am #

    Why does the lobster reef cost so much to maintain?

  2. Sean Webb January 31, 2013 at 12:16 pm #

    Hi Alan…, I am a director of Wreck to Reef.
    Thanks for your very valid question.

    This information was reported by BBC news from an interview we gave late last year.
    While we are now actively seeking media coverage, we are learning fast that sometimes the media can unintentionally mix up some of those facts and figures.

    The figure actually given was £20,000:00 and over a three year period, not one and for 12000 lobsters, not 6000. Very simply broken down, this is the cost of each juvenile lobster. It is hoped that they will be placed on the reef by volunteers.

    We have been involved with very detailed talks with Southern IFCA and we are hopeful that they will be able to fund the initial phase of this lobster re-stocking programme. We will then be in a position to approach the European Fisheries Fund for match funding.

    I can’t really go into too much detail about this next comment, but Neville Copperthwaite, Wreck to Reefs project coordinator is working closely with other much larger marine organisations and it is quite possible we could see tens of thousands of juvenile lobsters being released annually on Wreck to Reefs lobster re-stocking reef.

    Another point worth mentioning, it is not about these juvenile lobsters, it is about the berry’s they will produce. These eggs will seed 25 miles East and 25 miles west with each tide. All of this fits in with our permissions and a regional campaign supported by the National Lobster Hatchery.

    We will take a closer look at reports we re-circulate in the future.
    Thanks again Alan

  3. NickSquire March 27, 2013 at 2:57 pm #

    Arethereany clues as to which warshipsyou are looking at?

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